ISAF DDPM Windproof Smock

A few weeks back we looked at a fire resistant windproof smock in Desert DPM here, thanks to Michael Fletcher I have been able to add the more standard windproof smock to my collection, complete with a rather nice set of badges on the sleeves:imageThe design of this smock is very similar to the one we looked at previously, so I will only point out a few of the more obvious points. The Velcro patches on the sleeve are missing from this smock, and the fabric is very different in texture and colour. Here we have three different garments, showing the differences in fabric. Left to right we have this windproof smock, then the fire resistant windproof smock and on the right the rip stop fabric of the field jacket we looked at here:imageThe fabric used for this smock is a 50/50 poly cotton blend, the polyester obviously means there is a danger of the fabric melting at high heat, hence the development of the fire resistant version for those troops at greater risk of being exposed to flames. Again this smock has a hood, with a wire around the front, that can be rolled up and secured with a tape and button at the back of the neck:imageA drawstring helps adjust it, with plastic sliders on each end of the string:imageThese have a male and female connector that allow them to be fastened together so the ends are not dangling in the way:imageWhat is particularly nice about this smock are the patches on each sleeve- clearly this smock has been used in theatre and the insignia includes the famous Jerboa of the Desert Rats on one sleeve:imageNote also the reflective glint tape above it, and the sewn on Union Flag. The opposite sleeve has a second piece of glint tape, the TRF flash of dark blue/yellow/red for the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and a large round ISAF patch:imageISAF stands for the International Security Assistance Force and it was set up in 2001 as the NATO led security mission in Afghanistan. The British Army website gives some background to the role of ISAF:

The military mission in Afghanistan has been a partnership between the 49 nations – more than a quarter of the world’s countries – which constitutes the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF). On 11 August 2003 NATO assumed leadership of ISAF operations. The alliance became responsible for the command, co-ordination and planning of the force in Afghanistan.

Since NATO took command of ISAF, the Alliance has gradually expanded the reach of its mission, originally limited to Kabul, to cover Afghanistan’s whole territory.

ISAF is a key component of the international community’s engagement in Afghanistan, assisting the Afghan authorities in providing security, stability and creating the conditions for reconstruction and development with the help of 28 Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs).

Based in Kabul, the ISAF Headquarters serves as the operational command for the NATO-led mission. It interacts with the Afghan government, governmental and non-governmental organisations present in the country to assist with reconstruction, and supports the work of United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA).

As part of that mission troops serving in theatre wore the ISAF patch to clearly show their role and to aid esprit-de-corps across the various nations. This smock was worn by a soldier named ‘Williams’, whose name can still be seen under the marker pen used to try and obliterate the marking on the label:imageI am finding as I collect these jackets and smocks that there is a bewildering variety of designs, fabrics and variations, as ever I will try and bring you more examples as I find them and hopefully we can build up a fairly comprehensive selection over time.

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