Larkspur Radio Aerial Bag

In the aftermath of the Second World War, the British Army introduced a new radio system called (retrospectively) the ‘Larkspur’. Unlike wartime sets Larkspur used VHF frequencies so was more reliable and the cases were hermetically sealed to allow them to be used in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The radios came into widespread use in the late 1950s and early 1960s and remained in use until replaced by ‘Clansman’ in the 1970s, the old Larkspur system remained in use into the 1980s however. I have now started to put together a Larkspur set, and like my WS38 and WS88 sets this will be a back burner project, picking up items as and when I find them at a price low enough for a tight Yorkshireman!

My first piece is the subject of tonight’s post, the aerial bag for the radio:imageThe bag is made from cotton webbing, with leather straps and buckles to secure the main pouch for the aerials, which broke down into six sections. Two pockets are fitted to the front of the bag, secured with press studs. The larger one is at the end of the bag:imageWhilst a smaller one is provided near the top flap:imageThese pockets held two metal reels of cord for use as guy ropes, one aerial earthing attachment and three guy rope ground spikes. On the rear is a belt loop and a pair of leather straps and buckles:imageThe case has large stencilled lettering on the rear, reading ‘CASE AERIAL CAT’ catalogue numbers are also provided, an old style ZA stores code and a newer NSN number:imageThis is a starting point for a new collecting area in post war radios, there seems to be an awful lot of components to these sets compared with the earlier radio sets. They are however far cheaper than wartime sets…

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