Category Archives: Whistle

Tuesday Finds

Today’s Finds

Well its back to the second hand market today, after too long an absence. Whilst it was a bit quiet, I did pick up some nice bits including yet another ammunition box! My wife is very tolerant of these, but they do start to take up a bit of room after a while…

Ammunition Box

This ammunition box is made of wood and covered in stencil markings. It is worth remembering that ammunition boxes came as often in wood as they did in metal. Metal was a strategic resource, so if a box could be made of wood and be as safe as a metal one then this was the preferred policy. Wood was the traditional material for munitions boxes as it was cheap, durable and most importantly couldn’t cause sparks like metal boxes could.

imageThis box is dated 1943 on the base:

imageHowever it has been repainted and re-stencilled for reuse in 1953. I haven’t tracked down which type of box this is yet, so if anyone knows the model number, then please let me know so I can carry on my research.

40mm Shell
One of the best and longest lived anti aircraft guns in service is the Bofors 40mm. This was introduced into the British Army in 1937 and became the standard light anti aircraft gun in service throughout the Second World War. It was used as a standard towed artillery piece and on a variety of vehicles to become self propelled:

imageThis casing is dated 1942 and has a profusion of ordnance stamps on the base:imageTrench Whistle
Following on from last week’s pickup of a Metropolitan type Trench whistle, this week I was lucky enough to pick up the ‘Snail’ type to go with it. Its marked ‘J Hudson & Co, Birmingham, 1916’:imageRAF Observer Photograph
This rather elegant portrait photograph is of an Observer from the RAF in the Second World War. Sadly the chap isn’t identified, but his insignia is clearly visible:imageBritish India Passport

Finally we have this passport. Its not strictly military, but as it was issued in April 1944 I hope you will forgive its inclusion here. British subjects born and domiciled in India needed passports just like anyone else, and the government of India issued them with these:imageThis example was issued to a Miss Jayne St: Pierre Bunbury:imageThis particular example is stamped as having been issued in the North West Frontier Province and is overstamped as ‘cancelled’ presumably following Indian Independence.:image

Trench Whistle

I’m back from training in Cyprus and posts to the blog will now start again. Today I picked up this WW1 trench whistle:

imageThe whistle is dated 1915 and was manufactured by J Hudson & Co, Birmingham. Whistles such as this are of a type called ‘The Metropolitan’ patented by J Hudson in 1884. Originally they were used by police forces to give a clear audible signal between constables on the beat. The loud sound would prove equally useful in the noise and confusion of trench warfare. Officers and sergeants would have been issued or purchased whistles like these and used them to signal men to go over the top.

Police whistles tended to have chains, so the leather thong on this one suggests its military. The thong should be longer, but the end is missing and a new hole cut further down the thong to allow it to continue seeing service.